October 22 –
December 12, 2020
Jeffrey Gibson:Nothing is Eternal
Presented off-site and online

Current:
Online viewing in Wattis' homepage till December 12.

Outdoor screenings in New York City, on Bowery and Houston, organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands. (8pm, nightly, from November 13 - 20)

Jeffrey Gibson presents Nothing is Eternal, a newly commissioned video with musical composition. Conceived during this pandemic era, the immersive video work depicts the American flag in unsettling stillness, as a marker of territory, and projected onto bodies, while set to a heartrending soundtrack. At once melancholic and beautiful, Gibson renders the iconic image of the flag as both elastic and unyielding. The slow transformation through time, color, and form reflects both a distillation of our social collapse and the reinvention of self and community, referencing the movement and change that is so desired for this nation.

Nothing is Eternal belongs to no one and everyone, a video that moves through the Bay Area and beyond like water, slow and stretched across time. It appears in multiple locations simultaneously or in one for a while. It is, like the rest of us, ungrounded and melancholic and it is, like this time, irresolute. Presented during the 2020 general election, it embodies the contradiction of emotions that pervade our lives, yesterday as much as today, as we head towards an uncertain future. The work posits hope as much as it evinces a sense of mourning. Gibson asks viewers to imagine a destiny beyond our comprehension, on a pathway paved with both tremendous love and immense sorrow.

The work is as best a response that could be formed to address the violence of institutional timelines, of expectations that remain unreasonable and unsustainable, of a world in crisis, and of living in late capitalism, a train that continues to move with or without its passengers. It is produced through the care and love of many people on each coast, through numerous tears, and under extraordinary, demoralizing conditions.

Reopening should not be a return. There is no request to come back to the institution the way it was. This is an invitation to look outwards, to decenter ourselves, and to conceive of another day, elsewhere.

(continue reading full curatorial essay online here or download a PDF here)

Schedule of screenings and events (check our website and social media for updates):

October 22, 7 - 9pm:
Outdoor screening at Tenderloin National Forest
501 Ellis Street, San Francisco
Free
Attendees must wear a mask and enter through SWIM gallery (509 Ellis Street).

October 30 - November 3:
Online viewing at ybca.org and robertsprojectsla.com

November 13 - November 20:
Every night at 8:00 pm
Outdoor screenings on Bowery and Houston, NYC, organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Free

October 30 - December 12:
Online viewing at Wattis' homepage.

December 3 - December 11:
Every Thursday and Friday, 5 pm - 7:00 pm
Outdoor screenings at Headlands Center for the Arts
944 Simmonds Road, Sausalito, CA
Free
Attendees must wear a mask and book a 25-minute viewing slot in advance.

December 10:
Jeffrey Gibson moderates an online conversation with local high school students about the future of the United States. More details coming soon.

Note:
This exhibition is presented off-site and online. Our offices and galleries, at 360 Kansas Street, remain closed until further notice.

Jeffrey Gibson (b. 1972, Colorado, US) lives and works in the Hudson Valley, New York.

Jeffrey Gibson: Nothing is Eternal is curated by Kim Nguyen and organized by Diego Villalobos. Special thanks to Sikkema Jenkins & Co, Kavi Gupta Gallery, and Roberts Projects.

Press:
KQED, by Sarah Hotchkiss
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing Is Eternal, 2020; Courtesy of the artist, Sikkema & Jenkins Co, Kavi Gupta Gallery, and Roberts Projects.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing Is Eternal, 2020; Courtesy of the artist, Sikkema & Jenkins Co, Kavi Gupta Gallery, and Roberts Projects.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view at the Tenderloin National Forest. (Joseph Sanders/CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts)
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery,  organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery, organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery,  organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery, organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery,  organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.
Jeffrey Gibson, Nothing is Eternal, 2020; installation view on Huston and Bowery, organized in partnership with Art at a Time Like This and For Which It Stands.