June 1, 2015
When Joan Jonas completes a drawing, she often erases it and starts anew. “A gesture,” she says, “has the same weight as a drawing.” In that sense, her drawings remain in motion: instead of being finished “objects” meant for display, they exist only for the camera, or, in the context of a live performance, they interact with and interrupt a video projection.

The everyday objects explored in Paul Sietsema’s 16mm films are often sculptures created by hand for the express purpose of being filmed. As he shoots them, he consumes, alters, and sometimes even destroys them. For At the hour of tea (2013), Sietsema juxtaposes various configurations of found objects with references to his own process of making the film.

Our screening of At the hour of tea is followed by a conversation with the artist.

This is the ninth in a year-long series of events about and around the work of Joan Jonas. This event is organized by Elizabeth Mangini.


Listen to the conversation here:
At the hour of tea, 2013 (still), 16mm, silent. Courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks gallery<br />
At the hour of tea, 2013 (still), 16mm, silent. Courtesy of the artist and Matthew Marks gallery