April 13, 2015
There are always new ways to inhabit old stories. Joan Jonas retells ancient poems and myths in contemporary terms, and works with memory and narrative to generate emotional or actual landscapes we have experienced but can't articulate.

For the artist Doug Hall, a friend and contemporary of Jonas', to narrate is not only to tell a story but to establish a sense of time that takes the reader (or viewer) along with it, “like a leaf fallen into a river, moving at a speed that's determined by the current.” For him, language and image collide into each other to form a world in crisis.

Hall presents two of his own projects that span twenty years of work: Letters in the Dark (2014) and Terminal Landscape (1994). As his presentation unfolds, the artist works with his audience to understand the difference between the two works’ conceptual and emotional underpinnings.

This event is organized by Susan Gevirtz and Jeanne C. Finley and is the eighth in a year-long series of events about and around the work of Joan Jonas.



Listen to the talk here:
Doug Hall, Letters in the Dark, 2014, video still from the two-channel projected video installation with sound.
Doug Hall, Letters in the Dark, 2014, video still from the two-channel projected video installation with sound.